Design for Energy Efficiency

Another core principle of green chemistry deals with the energy that a chemical process uses, rather than the interactions of the chemicals themselves. This is Principle #6: Design for Energy Efficiency. It states:

Energy requirements should be recognized for their environmental and economic impacts and should be minimized. Synthetic methods should be conducted at ambient temperature and pressure.

Here is a video of Chemistry students at the University of Toronto explaining this principle in terms of controlling energy use within a lab.

Much of the time when we think of green chemistry we think of Principle #4, Designing Safer Chemicals. This is because the results of using toxic chemicals are easily detected and quantified. We can measure acres of land that can no longer be used after a chemical spill or leak. However, when it comes to energy, it’s much more challenging but just as important to determine how much is used, especially when evaluating the costs of using certain processes.

For instance, to use parts washers as an example, it’s much easier to quantify what goes into the parts washer – water, solvents, surfactants, and electricity. Aqueous cleaning is a greener and safer alternative to cleaning with solvents, but heat is an essential part of the process. Parts washers also contain multiple moving parts that act to spray or spin objects clean. The heat or steam that is allowed to escape after the parts washing process is over must be considered wastes along with the waste water, sludge, oil, dirt, and other contaminants.

The students in the above video discuss how much energy is wasted in a typical lab, but on a larger scale all of that waste is multiplied exponentially. Manufacturers must consider the expense of any industrial process, whether it is manufacturing or cleaning in order to operate profitably, but large scale heat waste can impact the environment or communities in a very negative way as well.

It’s our job at AEC Systems to design parts cleaners that use water, chemicals, heat, and energy as efficiently as possible, so that waste byproducts are produced at a minimum. Many companies today are striving for zero waste processes, and we want our parts washers to conform as closely to that ideal, whether that means reusing water, chemicals, heat, or motion or using less of any or all of those things. As the principle above states, environmental and economic impacts should be minimized so that our customers can operate profitably and are not faced with disposal hassles and costs.

How efficiently is your parts washer operating right now? If you’d like to discuss a better, more economical and environmentally friendly option, contact AEC Systems today.

 

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